Significant Publication: Collaborative Efforts between the United States and United Kingdom to Advance Prediction of High-Impact Weather

The following significant paper publication was reported to headquarters the week of May 19. NOAA authors are bolded.

  1. Collaborative Efforts between the United States and United Kingdom to Advance Prediction of High-Impact Weather”

By John S. Kain (NSSL) , Steve Willington, Adam J. Clark (NSSL), Steven J. Weiss (NWS SPC), Mark Weeks, Israel L. Jirak (NWS SPC), Michael C. Coniglio (NSSL), Nigel M. Roberts, Christopher D. Karstens (OU CIMMS/NSSL), Jonathan M. Wilkinson, Kent H. Knopfmeier (OU CIMMS/NSSL), Humphrey W. Lean, Laura Ellam, Kirsty Hanley, Rachel North, Dan Suri.

Published in May 2017 American Meteorological Society’s Bulletin of American Meteorological Society, pages 937-948.

Significance: The Met Office brought expertise gained from its efforts using convection-allowing models (CAMs) to better represent the convective storms that bring flash flooding in the United Kingdom. The infusion of Met Office models and perspectives dovetailed exceptionally well with the rapidly growing National Severe Storms Laboratory and Storm Prediction Center proficiency in using CAMs to help predict tornadoes, large hail, and damaging winds. The successful collaborative efforts of the Hazardous Weather Testbed, NSSL, SPC, and Met Office are demonstrating that international collaboration can provide synergy, efficiency, and important scientific advances when it is strongly supported at both grassroots and institutional levels.