About/Station Management

What is KPHI TV ?

KPHI TV is the fictitious television news station affiliated with research in the Probabilistic Hazard Information (PHI) project in NOAA’s Hazardous Weather Testbed. The KPHI TV Weather Team is comprised of broadcast meteorologists that participate in the HWT PHI project.  Participants are recruited nationwide from all market sizes. Broadcast participants perform typical job functions under a simulated television studio environment as they receive experimental probabilistic information and severe weather warnings. NOAA researchers study how broadcast meteorologists interpret, use, and communicate probabilistic information. Decision points of interest include when to run crawls, post to social media, interrupt commercials, and interrupt programming. Researchers use results from the data collected in the KPHI TV studio to help shape the future of the National Weather Service warning paradigm.

Station Management (NOAA Researchers)

Holly Obermeier, KPHI TV Co-News Director

Holly is an associate scientist for the University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and the Earth Systems Research Laboratory (ESRL).  Her areas of research include exploring the use and communication of probabilistic hazard information (PHI) in weather warnings, and implementing PHI within the Hazard Services warning dissemination framework.  She has worked with both NWS forecasters and end-users (primarily broadcast meteorologists) under the Hazardous Weather Testbed since 2015.  Holly formerly worked as a researcher with the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies (CIMMS) at the University of Oklahoma and the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL).  Before entering the world of research, Holly was an on-air broadcast meteorologist since 2008.  She worked extensively in severe weather markets, including KLBK in Lubbock, TX and KETV in Omaha, NE.  Holly completed her undergraduate and graduate education at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Kodi Berry, KPHI TV Co-News Director:

Kodi is a research scientist and Sea Grant Liaison with the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies (CIMMS) at the University of Oklahoma and the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL). Her primary area of research includes how broadcast meteorologists use and communicate probabilistic information in the Hazardous Weather Testbed. Kodi also manages an interdisciplinary project, called CI-FLOW, that models coastal flooding during landfalling hurricanes in North Carolina. Before joining CIMMS/NSSL, she was the project manager on a project to modernize Croatia’s hydrometeorological service. Kodi completed her undergraduate education at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and graduate education at the University of Oklahoma.

Kim Klockow-McClainKPHI TV Research Consultant: 

Kim is a research scientist and Societal Applications Coordinator with the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies (CIMMS) at the University of Oklahoma and the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL). Her research involves behavioral science focused on weather and climate risk, and specifically explores the effects of risk visualization on judgment, and perceptions of severe weather risk from place-based and cognitive perspectives. Before joining CIMMS/NSSL, Kim was a UCAR Postdoctoral Researcher and Policy Advisor at the NOAA OAR Office of Weather and Air Quality. Kim completed her undergraduate education at Purdue University and graduate education at the University of Oklahoma.

Tiffany MeyerKPHI TV Chief Engineer:

Tiffany is a research associate with the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies (CIMMS) at the University of Oklahoma and the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL). She facilitates and manages AWIPS-2 software builds and data-flow in all experiments that occur within the Experimental Warning Program. Her most recent research has focused on forecasting the probability that cloud-to-ground lightning will occur within the next hour, which has been tested by National Weather Service forecasters, emergency managers, and broadcasters within the Probabilistic Hazard Information (PHI) Prototype Experiment.